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Most of the stuff in this was also in yesterdays dinner. The Tuscan kale is from the other night, butternut squash, andouille, duck fat, chicken broth and onion are all "leftovers".
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Local farmers market had some Tuscan kale. I had that duck stock from two weeks ago. I figured if I could find some smoked andouille sausage and some potatoes that I could have a pretty good dinner. Also cooked today: lemon pepper and then lemon pepper chicken and rice. I took the left overs from the fryer chicken and made chicken stock for later in the week.
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Hash browns with green onions cooked in duck fat. Bok Choy with some garlic and more duck fat. The egg was also done with duck fat but it was supposed to be better than a chicken egg. I went to the store, picked up 4 duck eggs. When I cracked the egg to cook it I learned I had made a mistake. What I though was "duck egg" turned out to be "balut". Since I wasn't craving feathery chicken fetus for dinner I resorted to the chicken egg instead. Maybe I will have balut for desert.
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I got a call today from someone wanting to know where the flank steak has gone. I posted a recipe on Sunday that calls for it and he wanted to make fajitas and couldn't find any. It has gotten hard to find in most traditional markets. If you want to find it the best bet is either a Mexican market with a butcher (carnicería) or one of those mega Asian markets. Why is it so hard to find? Well some of it goes to high end eateries. Some gets sent over seas. A good chunk of it gets used in California in their epic carne asada burritos. It like skirt stake but has no fat in it. It requires either slow cooking for large bites or fast cooking for thin slices. Last weeks recipe is a fast cook so you shave it as thin as you can. You can use the "throw it in the freezer for an hour and then cut it against the grain" trick for the best effects in that method. Or marinate it and cook it slowly for some carne asada awesomeness.
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Pita, hummus and bigilla. Normally I use chickpeas from a can for my hummus. But this time I decided to do start with dried chickpeas. This is the creamiest hummus I have ever had. I will never use the canned stuff again. The bigilla is pretty good but not perfect. Will have to modify that recipe over the coming months. It took forever to track down dried fava/broad beans to make it and when I did find it the smallest bag they had was 1 kilo. That should be enough to last me 5 batches so I will have plenty to practice with.
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